Curriculum

Effective for the Class of 2021

The University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy Curriculum is based on the philosophy that a successful student builds expertise in many specific areas of pharmacy by gaining mastery of foundation material from the biomedical, pharmaceutical, social and clinical sciences. The foundation material provides an intellectual framework on which to build experiential knowledge. Conversely, the experiential curriculum provides specific examples that validate the foundation principles taught. The school embraces diversity in teaching approach, including active learning, traditional teaching strategies, up-to-date laboratories, robust use of technology, and an emphasis on learning as a life-long activity. The curriculum is meant to be constantly evolving to maintain a progressive and reiterative connection to interprofessional patient care and the pharmacy profession, both locally and globally via the Wisconsin Idea.

First Year (DPH-1)

Fall Semester
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Introduction to Drug Action & Drug Delivery I (with lab) 718-420 4 cr.
Applications of physical principles and modern methods of analysis to pharmaceutical systems.
Pharmaceutical Biochemistry 718-432 4 cr.
Chemistry of metabolic processes and products of living matter with emphasis on pharmaceutical and medicinal aspects as well as recombinant DNA technology. Laboratory experience with the chemistry of metabolic processes, products of living matter and recombinant DNA.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I 728-425 1 cr.
This required PharmD experiential course complements didactic coursework in communication, practice-based skills, and the pharmacists’s role in the health care system. Students will participate in various community-based experiences, including group collaboration with a senior partner, observing pharmacists’ roles in practice settings, and providing screenings and education outreach.
Pathways in Pharmacy Practice 728-461 1 cr.
An introduction to, and exploration of, contemporary pharmacy practice settings and opportunities for career advancement.
Pharmacy in the Health Care System (with lab) 732-411 3 cr.
This course introduces students to: (1) the public health care system and pharmacists’ roles in the public health care system; (2) the health care system and how pharmacy fits within the health care system; (3) the patient’s perspective of health, illness, medication taking and patient-pharmacist interaction; (4) principles of educational assessment and patient consultation, and (5) skills and strategies to overcome barriers to individualized patient consultation.
Physiology (with lab) 762-335 5 cr.
This course presents all of the major systems of the human body, providing a broad, integrated understanding of function from the cellular to the organ-system level.
Spring Semester
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Pathophysiologic Principles of Human Diseases 704-404 3 cr.
Primarily for students of pharmacy and nursing to provide a basic understanding of the causes, pathophysiology, pathology and clinical manifestations of disease states. Required course for pharmacy and nursing programs.
Introduction to Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics (with lab) 718-421 3 cr.
A conceptual introduction to the way that drugs act and are processed in vivo, including receptor theory, ligand-macromolecule binding, biopharmaceutics, drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics.
Medicinal Chemistry I 718-531 3 cr.
Chemistry of medicinal products, including cholinergic, adrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic agents, antidepressants, sedative/hypnotics, antianxiety drugs, opioid drugs acting at histamine receptors, and inhibitors of mediator release.
Pharmaceutical Calculations, Dispensing and Compounding (with lab) 718-541 3 cr.
Introductory laboratory course in compounding and dispensing of pharmaceutical dosage forms, including sterile products. Includes practice in interpretation of prescription orders, pharmaceutical calculations, compounding procedures, physical manipulation of drugs and dosage form components, and product packaging and labeling.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II 728-426 1 cr.
This required PharmD experiential course complements didactic coursework in communication, practice-based skills, and the pharmacists’s role in the health care system. Students will participate in various community-based experiences, including group collaboration with a senior partner, observing pharmacists’ roles in practice settings, and providing screenings and education outreach.
Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmacy Practice (with lab) 732-414 3 cr.
The goals of this course are to introduce students to psychosocial and behavioral aspects of pharmacy practice and patient care, including (1) the pharmacist’s role in patient care and public health; (2) patient perspective and factors related to health and medication use; (3) patient-pharmacist interaction and communication; and (4) principles of personnel management in pharmacy practice.
Introduction to Professional Development and Engagement I Pending
approval
1 cr.
Assists students with career exploration and recognition of how their knowledge, skills, abilities and values further their professional development.

Second Year (DPH-2)

Fall Semester
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Pharmacology I 718-521 3 cr.
Pharmacological actions of important drugs, including drugs that affect the peripheral nervous system, the central nervous system, and the gastrointestinal tract.
Drug Delivery Systems for Pharmacotherapy 718-540 3 cr.
The application of physical, chemical and biological principles to the study of drug delivery using a variety of solid, solution and disperse systems as dosage forms. Rationale for therapeutic use, formulation and manufacture, and evaluation of stability and bioavailability.
Parenteral Therapy for Nutrition (with lab) 718-542 3 cr.
Advanced extemporaneous prescription compounding and preparation of sterile products, with emphasis on physico-chemical stability and compatibility of drugs and dosage forms. Also addresses principles of appraisal, comparison, and selection of appropriate commercial brand name and generic products.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience III 728-525 1 cr.
The third of six in a three-year sequence which will introduce and expose second-year Doctor of Pharmacy students to the various roles of pharmacists and the many patient-care opportunities that exist in and out of traditional pharmacy practice settings.
Pharmacotherapy I 728-555 3 cr.
Clinical application of medications in the management of various disease states. Assessment and therapeutic monitoring of drug therapy with emphasis on the concepts of pharmacokinetics/dynamics, drug interactions, pharmacy practice, and patient counseling. Topics include medical nomenclature, basic clinical laboratory values, clinical pharmacokinetics, and neuropsychiatric therapeutics.
Integrated Pharmacotherapy Skills I 728-553 1 cr.
Learn pharmacotherapeutic skills necessary to develop competence as a pharmacist to assume the responsibility to improve therapeutic patient outcomes related to medication use. Skills will include patient communication, identification and resolution of drug-related problems, and documentation.
Introduction to Professional Development and Engagement II Pending
approval
0 cr.
Assists students with career exploration and recognition of how their knowledge, skills, abilities and values further their professional development.
Spring Semester
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Pharmacology II 718-522 3 cr.
Pharmacological actions of important drugs, including hematopoietic, thrombolytic, antihyperlipidemic, immunopharmacologic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, diuretic, antihypertensive, antianginal, and anti-arrhythmic agents, and agents used to treat congestive heart failure.
Medicinal Chemistry II 718-532 2 cr.
Chemistry of medicinal products, including antihyperlipidemics, glucocorticoids, estrogens, progestins, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, antitumor agents, and enzyme inhibitors.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience IV 728-526 1 cr.
The fourth of six in a three-year sequence which will introduce and expose second-year Doctor of Pharmacy students to the various roles of pharmacists and the many patient-care opportunities that exist in and out of traditional pharmacy practice settings.
Pharmacotherapy II 728-556 3 cr.
Clinical application of medications in the management of various disease states. Assessment and therapeutic monitoring of disease states and drug therapy using the concepts of pharmacokinetics/dynamics, drug interactions, pharmacy practice and patient counseling. Topics include cardiovascular and pulmonary therapeutics.
Integrated Pharmacotherapy Skills II 728-554 1 cr.
Learn pharmacotherapeutic skills necessary to develop competence as a pharmacist to assume the responsibility to improve therapeutic patient outcomes related to medication use. Skills will include patient communication, identification and resolution of drug-related problems, and documentation.
Drug Literature Evaluation 728-570 3 cr.
Fundamentals of literature evaluation to enable students to make decisions regarding the clinical use of drugs.
Comprehensive Immunization Delivery 728-650 1 cr.
Addresses vaccine-preventable diseases and the implementation of pharmacy-based immunization delivery programs.
Managing Pharmacy Systems for Patient Care 732-514 2 cr.
Introduces concepts and principles related to managing pharmacy operations and systems for patient care, and managing financial aspects of pharmacies.
Introduction to Professional Development and Engagement III Pending
approval
1 cr.
Assists students with career exploration and recognition of how their knowledge, skills, abilities and values further their professional development.

Third Year (DPH-3)

Fall Semester
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Pharmacology III 718-623 3 cr.
Pharmacological actions and underlying basic and clinical science of antimicrobial and antiviral drugs. Pharmacology of hormones and other drugs affecting the endocrine system.
Nonprescription Products and Self Care 728-638 2 cr.
The lecture provides students with the knowledge needed to perform triage and make therapeutic recommendations for illnesses commonly encountered in ambulatory pharmacy practice. The lab expands upon lecture knowledge, provides active learning strategies for teaching triage skills, and provides opportunities to practice the application of triage skills.
Pharmaceutical Biotechnology & Pharmacogenomics 726-645 2-3 cr.*
Facilitates the understanding and application of the principles of pharmaceutical biotechnology and pharmacogenomics. The third, optional, elective credit, open only to PharmD students, will consist of clinical case studies in biotechnology and pharmacogenomics, to apply theory to clinical pharmacy practice.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience V 728-625 0 cr.
Experiences provided by this course permit students to integrate learning from previous didactic courses (drug literature review, pharmacotherapy, and patient/provider communications) into caring for patients. Students actively participate in patient care activities while under the supervision of a clinical instructor.
Pharmacotherapy III 728-655 3 cr.
Clinical application of medications in the management of various disease states. Assessment and therapeutic monitoring of disease states and drug therapy using the concepts of pharmacokinetics/dynamics, drug interactions, pharmacy practice and patient counseling. Topics include various renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, rheumatologic and immunologic disease therapeutics.
Integrated Pharmacotherapy Skills III 728-653 1 cr.
Learn and build upon pharmacotherapeutic skills necessary to develop competence as a pharmacist to assume the responsibility to improve therapeutic patient outcomes related to medication use. Skills will include patient and healthcare provider communication, identification and resolution of drug-related problems, and documentation, and complex problem solving skills.
Pharmacy Law & Regulation 732-611 2-3 cr.
Federal and Wisconsin laws related to drug manufacture, drug distribution, drug use, and pharmacy practice.
Introduction to Professional Development and Engagement IV Pending
approval
0 cr.
Assists students with career exploration and recognition of how their knowledge, skills, abilities and values further their professional development.
Professional Electives, as needed varies varies
  Additional credits, as needed varies varies

*The third (optional) credit is a professional elective credit.

Spring Semester
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Safety & Quality in the Medication Use System (with lab) 726-608 3 cr.
Addresses the problems of medication errors and quality in health care, problem resolutions, methods of assessment, and intervention implementation and quality management.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience VI 728-626 2 cr.
Experiences provided by this course permit students to integrate learning from previous didactic courses (drug literature review, pharmacotherapy, and patient/provider communications) into caring for patients. Students actively participate in patient care activities while under the supervision of a clinical instructor.
Pharmacotherapy IV 728-656 3 cr.
Clinical application of medications in the management of various disease states. Assessment and therapeutic monitoring of disease states and drug therapy using the concepts of pharmacokinetics/dynamics, drug interactions, pharmace practice and patient counseling. Topics include hematology/oncology and infectious disease therapeutics.
Integrated Pharmacotherapy Skills IV 728-654 1 cr.
Learn and build upon pharmacotherapeutic skills necessary to develop competence as a pharmacist to assume the responsibility to improve therapeutic patient outcomes related to medication use. The course will focus on building complex problem solving skills including the integration of patient and provider communication, documentation, and evaluation of integrated patient cases with a secondary focus on patient profile reviews and comprehensive medication review and assessment.
Pharmacist Communication: Educational & Behavioral Interventions (with lab) 732-652 2 cr.
Educational & Behavioral Interventions (with lab) Intermediate principles of pharmacist communication with patients and other care givers; weekly communications laboratory provides opportunity to refine skills in listening, interviewing, counseling, and use of various educational and behavioral strategies to improve drug use.
Introduction to Professional Development and Engagement V Pending
approval
1 cr.
Assists students with career exploration and recognition of how their knowledge, skills, abilities and values further their professional development.
Professional Electives, as needed varies varies
  Additional credits, as needed varies varies

Fourth Year (DPH-4)

Summer, Fall and Spring Semesters
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Acute Pharmaceutical Care Clerkship 728-740 6 cr.
This required PharmD experiential course integrates prior didactic course work in pharmacotherapy, pathophysiology, and drug literature evaluation into the provision of pharmaceutical care to hospitalized patients. The student will participate in the provision of direct pharmaceutical care, by monitoring drug therapy, providing patient counseling, and providing drug information and pharmacokinetic dosing recommendations for patients. In addition, the student will gain experience and insight into health education by interacting with other health professional students.
Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care Clerkship 728-741 6 cr.
This required PharmD experiential course integrates prior course work in pharmacotherapy, pathophysiology, and drug literature evaluation into the provision of pharmaceutical care to ambulatory patients. Students will conduct patient interviews and assessments, provide drug information to patients and health professionals, and monitor drug therapy in ambulatory settings.
Health System Pharmacy Practice Clerkship 728-742 6 cr.
This required PharmD experiential course integrates prior didactic course work into the provision of care and the development and delivery of services for hospitalized patients. The student will be exposed to the 5 pillars of the medication use system (prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, administering, monitoring), plus procurement/storage along with the hospital services and processes that support them. The experience will also include, but is not limited to, exposure to hospital-based services/programs/committees such as investigational drugs, Pharmacy and Therapeutics, quality/performance improvement (DUE/MUE), technologies, and personnel management. The experience will also expose the student to best practices, regulatory, legal, and accreditation standards/requirements that influence the quality and delivery of care to hospitalized patients.
Community Pharmacy Practice Clerkship 728-743 6 cr.
The purpose of the community pharmacy clerkship is to provide the student with an educational experience where they can develop the skills and judgment necessary to apply the knowledge gained in the basic and clinical sciences to specific patient care situations. In addition, the course seeks to demonstrate the philosophy that clinical (APPE) and distributive pharmaceutical services should be patient oriented and integrated in contemporary ambulatory practice.
  Elective clerkship * 6 cr.
  Elective clerkship * 6 cr.
  Elective clerkship * 6 cr.
  Elective clerkship * 6 cr.

* Clerkships (pharmacy practice experience) to total 42 credits. See notes below for more information.

Elective Clerkships

Summer, Fall and Spring Semesters
Course Name & Description Number Credits
Elective Pharmacy Practice Clerkship 728-760 6 cr.
This required PharmD experiential course integrates prior didactic course work in pharmacotherapy, pathophysiology, and drug literature evaluation into the provision of pharmaceutical care to hospitalized patients and ambulatory patients. The student will participate in the provision of direct pharmaceutical care, by monitoring drug therapy, providing patient counseling, and providing drug information and pharmacokinetic dosing recommendations for patients.
Veterinary Pharmacy Clerkship 728-764 6 cr.
Practical experience in a veterinary medicine environment with emphasis on the drug treatment of diseases in animals.
Clinical Research and Pharmacy Investigation 728-769 6 cr.
This experiential learning course offers students the opportunity to gain experience with clinical and translational research in a mentored situation. Students will learn study design, laboratory techniques, statistical analysis, manuscript preparation, and ethical principles of research.

Notes:

  1. Some students will be assigned to clerkship sites outside the Madison area; some students will not receive their desired choice of clerkship region (“hub”).
  2. A total of 42 credits of clerkships is required for graduation. Clerkship credits in excess of 42 will count as professional elective credits.
  3. Depending upon a particular student’s situation, a variable number of professional elective credits and/or free-choice elective credits will be needed in the DPH-3 year. Students should consult with their academic advisor to ensure they are meeting all requirements for graduation.
  4. Students are not permitted to count as PharmD professional electives any courses which were taken before entrance into the School of Pharmacy.